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  • Week Intensive of Neurorehab – Review

    August 26th, 2017 by

    I just got home from a full week of daily neurorehabilitation at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore. By the end of today, we managed to get my ankle to an active -10 degrees of dorsiflexion (Monday was -25) and passive to +17 (Monday was 0). Since ankle tightness is my major problem, we’re considering that Continue Reading..

    Determining an ASIA Score and the Role of a Physiatrist in Neurorehabilitation

    August 23rd, 2017 by

    If you don’t have a significant injury or medical condition, you don’t need a physiatrist. You can stop reading. But if you do have one of the above things, a physiatrist can be one of the most valuable treatment partners you have. A physiatrist is like a physical therapist, except a medical doctor. His or Continue Reading..

    Goal: 0 Percent Dorsiflexion (Adventures in Neurorehabilitation)

    August 21st, 2017 by

    Today marks Day 1 of a 2-week exploration of neurorehabilitation at The Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore – one of the nation’s premier spinal cord rehabilitation centers. (Multiple sclerosis is, in case you’re wondering, considered a spinal cord injury). Most people with my functional ability would be happy with the mobility they have, especially after Continue Reading..

    Neurorehabilitation in the Ocean

    August 8th, 2017 by

    I had the great blessing of a childhood spent near a beach. It wasn’t the best beach. The water wasn’t clear, the tourist traps were tacky, and parking was a nightmare. But, I would bet that no one really fares better in childhood fun than those of us lucky enough to be raised near a Continue Reading..

    Neurological Medications and Their Impact on Exercise

    November 17th, 2016 by

    Most neurological clients are on multiple medications, both to manage symptoms and in the cases of chronic diseases such as MS and Parkinson’s disease, to slow disease progression.What does that mean for you as a teacher?First, you need to understand that many of the medications for neurological symptoms cause… wait for it… neurological symptoms. That’s Continue Reading..

    Ten Tips for Working with Neurological Clients

    November 17th, 2016 by

    Program design for clients with central nervous system problems is pretty similar, regardless of what the problem is – stroke, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, head injury, etc. Sure, there are differences between the disease processes and treatments, but as exercise professionals, there are certain things that hold true for all of them. Here are my Continue Reading..

    Walking Funny? Here Are a Couple of Reasons Why

    July 5th, 2016 by

    (photo from Pilates Anytime – Wobbly: A Balance workshop) If you’ve taken a workshop with me, you have probably heard me wax poetic on the importance of strengthening the gluteus medius (glute med). In the neurological as well as the normal populations, weakness here is one of the main problems in walking. In my Balance Tutorial on Pilates Continue Reading..

    The Dilemma of Choice in Chronic Disease

    December 24th, 2015 by

    Over the summer, I had a massive liver tumor removed. My PT found it. I had a CT scan. I met with a liver surgeon. He said it had to come out a.s.a.p. The surgery was scheduled for the following week. A student later asked me if I learned anything from the situation. Nope, I thought. Continue Reading..

    Improving Dizziness with Exercise

    October 6th, 2015 by
    VestibularSystem

    If a client comes to you and says the word “dizzy,” that should be your cue that there is something amiss with either the vestibular system or the nerve pathways that send its information to or from the brain. The vestibular system is one of the three neurological keepers of balance (the other two being Continue Reading..

    Understanding Fear of Heights (and Falling)

    August 4th, 2015 by

    You stand perfectly well on the sidewalk, but if you’re up on a box or ladder, you start to feel wobbly. Ever wonder why?   The fear of heights is a common one. Actually, fear of heights is slightly different than the true fear most people have – the fear of falling. The fear of Continue Reading..